Walt Disney’s Assassins Creed IV: Black Flag

Walt Disney's Assassins Creed IV - Black Flag

Walt Disney’s Assassins Creed IV: Black Flag

by Steve Napierski to Images

I know it says Walt Disney, but I’m really getting more of a Dreamworks Animation vibe from the artwork.

I really miss the traditional animations that Walt Disney Animation Studios used to do. I get that computer animated films are the “thing”, but there’s just a certain level of heart and character that simply cannot be replicated without painstakingly drawing each frame of animation.

I was really excited when Disney released The Princess and the Frog, but then it’s been computer animated again since. I know the directors of The Princess and the Frog, Ron Clements and John Musker, are working on a new featured film for Disney called Moana. No word yet on the animation style, but I am really hoping for traditional. Since John Lasseter is still the chief creative officer at Walt Disney Animation Studios, it is a possibility. I’ve got my fingers crossed!

source: deviantART

Discussion (9)¬

  1. Kaye
    Kaye says:
    December 15, 2013 at 9:40 am #

    Not sure if you saw Wreck-It-Ralph, but the short before the film, Paperman, was the ideal hybrid of classic Disney and computer animation. If there was a full-length film like that, I’d watch it at the drop of a hat.

    • Steve Napierski
      Steve Napierski says:
      December 15, 2013 at 10:01 am #

      I’ve seen Wreck-It-Ralph and I did enjoy it, but it’s still not the same. Paperman was good, but there’s more to it than just adding outlines or textures. Imagine if shows like Adventure Time were done solely with computer animation. They definitely wouldn’t feel the same.

      It’s hard for me to articulate exactly what I mean on this issue, maybe someone else will be able to explain it better.

      • Nobody
        Nobody says:
        December 15, 2013 at 11:33 am #

        I know what you mean. It is hard to put into words but there is something about Disney’s traditional animation that adds more depth to the work than you can get with CGI. I’m not saying CGI is bad but it shouldn’t be considered the only option for animation.

        The same goes for video games. The major game producers don’t want to make side scrolling games anymore because 3D is considered the hot thing.

        Newer isn’t always better and sadly we will probably lose the masters of the old way before the studios realize this. We can only hope indy animation studios and game makers can train a new generation to replace them when the time comes.

        • bidoopoo
          bidoopoo says:
          December 15, 2013 at 2:59 pm #

          I understand what you’re both saying, but to me it has the same effect of the people who insist music played by records sounds BETTER than digital. I don’t buy the argument for a second.

          If traditional animation/records are so superior to something new, why are they such a niche/diminishing market?

          • Steve Napierski
            Steve Napierski says:
            December 15, 2013 at 5:24 pm #

            Computer generated is definitely not taking over the television market. Very few computer generated television series are successful. It’s a lot easier to name the ones that were, than the ones there weren’t.

            Main draw is that it’s quicker to create computer generated feature films. Maybe the success is because they’re not traditionally animated and the west has a stigma that cartoons are for children. This is the way they meet in the middle.

          • Thief
            Thief says:
            December 16, 2013 at 5:10 am #

            To use a music analogy, it’s more like the difference between synth-pop and classical. One uses the skill of an entire orchestra, the other uses one guy with a synthesiser and an auto-tune machine.

            I don’t buy the records argument either, although it does have a *little* merit: There were standards for audio dynamic range for records, where CD’s are often artificially “loud”, destroying their dynamic range and clipping off all the peaks (often referred to as the “loudness war”. Wiki even has a page on it). A properly mastered CD, however, is *far* superior to a record.

  2. Wryy
    Wryy says:
    December 15, 2013 at 12:02 pm #

    I totally understand what you’re saying,
    it really annoys me that EVERYTHING is CG nowadays.

    I miss the traditional drawing that made animations a real charm.
    It’s really sad to see more companies going for CG, even in anime.

  3. kit
    kit says:
    December 15, 2013 at 11:03 pm #

    the style reminds me of road to el dorado

  4. Amethyst
    Amethyst says:
    December 16, 2013 at 2:31 am #

    Problem is that The Princess and the Frog wasn’t very good while Tangled and Frozen were great. I know the animation style had nothing to do with that, but it’s not helping traditional animation’s case any.