Rejecting Gender Identity Roles

Rejecting Gender Identity Roles

Rejecting Gender Identity Roles

by Steve Napierski to Comics

Before I begin, we all understand that the comic is about violent video games and not gender issues, right? Just making sure we’re on the same page.

So, I have two daughters. My wife and I are not just raising them to be good girls, but rather good human beings. We do not limit whom or what they play with and/or watch on television based on their genders, but based on our own better judgement about what is appropriate for kids their age. I would like to believe that they like what they like because of whom they are and not because of gender roles that have been put upon them by society.

That said, they are still girls. We somehow want to believe that boys and girls think and act exactly the same, but because of these “imposed” cultural and societal ideas they act differently. To that, I’m going to say, “Bullshit!” My daughters are both unique individuals, but they definitely like and do things that my male friends and I would have never done in a million years growing up. Not because of our parents or cultural influence, but because boys and girls/men and women are simply different. I’m not really sure why this is such a bad thing for some people. It’s just part of who we are.

With that said, the following is so friggin’ true…

It’s Not About The Nail

Discussion (10)¬

  1. Haohmaru
    Haohmaru says:
    April 28, 2014 at 3:19 pm #

    I see these parents dressing their boys up like girls and vice versa. Psychiatry looks to have a long, profitable future ahead of it.

    • Kage
      Kage says:
      April 29, 2014 at 12:08 am #

      If the kids are doing it themselves, it’s completely normal pretend play. If parents are doing it to them after a certain age, and they don’t like it, yeah, you’d be right.

  2. Vilhelm
    Vilhelm says:
    April 28, 2014 at 5:05 pm #

    The reason it is a “bad thing” to some people is that jerks (not talking about you here) use “girls and boys are just different” as an excuse when forcing people into gender roles. Is there some truth to it? Maybe. But some people use that small bit of poorly-understood and unquantifiable truth as a hammer.

  3. Marco
    Marco says:
    April 29, 2014 at 3:09 am #

    So are you calling “bullshit” on societal structures because two individuals you know behave a certain way?, who live within a society where other girls behave the same way? In other words, 0.000001% of the population behave in a way that is not gender neutral in your eyes, therefore there is no such thing? =/

    • Grif
      Grif says:
      April 29, 2014 at 5:33 pm #

      If men and women’s brains were not innately different in several ways, as an example, transsexuals would likely not exist. There would be no “inherent feeling” of wrongness in them if both traditional gender’s brains were identical in every way.

      That being said, there are certain societal suggestions that can be and many times are introduced into children. There’s certain things you cannot change in the brain through suggestion and vice versa.The nature vs nurture debate is the obvious centerpiece in this argument. To that end, based on age, varying degrees of each side are shown to have an increased or decreased influence on the individual.

      My conclusion: It’s neither one or the other in their entirety, but they both have an extraordinary possibility to affect people’s self-perceived freedom of choice in many ways.

      Also, this is just my ramblings, and the point I was making wasn’t in refutation of yours.

      • Marco
        Marco says:
        May 1, 2014 at 4:49 am #

        isn’t more likely then that there are more differences within groups than between groups? also, what we call feminity and masculinity are mostly social constructs, which I believe does that gender is a false dichotomy, because it has traditionally been grouped with which sex you have. Other cultures have had more than one gender before european colonisizers came and brought the western culture and ways of looking at gender.

        Interesting reading your points Grif.

    • Addie
      Addie says:
      May 1, 2014 at 10:09 am #

      I am also a father of a girl, a father that bought into the whole “gender is a social construct”. A father who actively tried to stay away from pink princesses and baby dolls. A father who didn’t have his daughter around that many other children and most of the other parent friends I had were with boys. And guess what, my step mother bought her a Minnie mouse toy and she was hooked on pink purple baby dolls and so on. So I let go of that notion, went full throttle into the Disney princess thing and the two of us are happier for it.

      My mom hated violence of all kinds, and actively tried to prevent me as a child from ever owning weapon toys. But I would play with anything like a weapon beating up “bad guys”. A baseball bat would now be a sword. And my moms final realization that this was a loosing battle was when I was in first grade and a friend of mine taught me how to make a gun out of folded paper, it would even cock like a gun and everything (the way the paper was set up would allow the ‘barrel’ part to slide). I still remember that being the coolest thing i ever had.

      So while yes I do agree that there are SOME thing about masculinity and femininity that are just social constructs, this being mainly what one gender can wear and what another gender cannot. There is a definite difference between genders (on the large scale) both physical and psychological. And these differences make sense from a evolutionary stand point.

  4. MOELANDER
    MOELANDER says:
    April 29, 2014 at 5:26 am #

    I remember the 80s. Hot Pink was a manly color back then.

    • cappch
      cappch says:
      April 29, 2014 at 10:34 am #

      Before WWII baby boys were dressed in pink and baby girls in blue.

      • Haohmaru
        Haohmaru says:
        April 29, 2014 at 6:31 pm #

        Historically, all babies and toddlers were all dressed in girls clothing. At those ages, you really can’t tell most of the time.